The Sources

Today a copy of Barnaby Rudge arrived for me at the SDSHS Press offices through interlibrary loan. No, it’s not my light reading for the morning coffee break. It’s for the Pioneer Girl Project. But what, you may ask, do Laura Ingalls Wilder and Charles Dickens have to do with each other? Other than their mutual status as classic authors?

(If you can guess why this book is on my desk, you’re good.)

As we edit the annotations by award-winning Wilder biographer Pamela Smith Hill, I am impressed by the breadth and depth of background it takes to understand a life. Even a normal person’s life. For isn’t that what makes Laura Ingalls Wilder special: that for most of her life, she was not a celebrity? To her contemporaries, she was literally the girl next door (or on the next quarter section), yet as an author, she makes her readers see what is extraordinary and worth telling in the everyday lives of everyday people.

And how many details make up such a life! All the source materials for the annotations come across my desk. For the first quarter of the manuscript, I have several articles on the Osage Indians, a book on medicine during the Civil War era. Another on women’s hair ornaments, a pamphlet on public-land laws, and a serious tome on the history of Redwood County, Minnesota. And a Dickens novel.

Image from Barnaby Rudge by Charles Dickens

An image from an early Barnaby Rudge

We don’t know if Wilder read Barnaby Rudge, but we do know that Dickens and his work had a far-reaching effect on the popular culture of the time. In the original, unedited “Pioneer Girl” manuscript, Wilder says about one of her cousins: “Edith was to [sic] small to know us but she laughed at me and held out her little hands. They all called her Dolly Varden because she had a pretty dress of calico that was called that.” Not being an English major, I had no clue what this passage might mean. But Dolly Varden, it turns out, was a character from Barnaby Rudge, a flirtatious beauty who inspired a style of dress in the late nineteenth century. So even this unlikely source provides a little more insight into Wilder’s world.

Imagine writing about your own childhood. How many of the details would be obscure or incomprehensible to a reader eighty years hence? When I visited my own cousins earlier this year, I teased one of them about his Justin Bieber haircut. Someday, a remark like that will require annotation. One of the greatest values of the Pioneer Girl Project is the way in which it enriches our experience of the things that Wilder and her family, friends, and neighbors knew on a day-to-day basis.

Rodger Hartley, editorial assistant, SDSHS Press

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6 thoughts on “The Sources

  1. Dolly Varden, the nickname for a couple of little female cousins in the Little House books. Because of Dolly Varden pink fabric.

  2. In “By The Shores of Silver Lake” the first chapter, Laura says her Aunt Ruby had a little girl whose name was Dolly Varden. Is this true?

    • The short answer is: we can’t be sure. The 1880 federal census, taken a year before the death of Laura’s aunt Ruby, confirms that she was married to a Joseph Card, but lists only one child, George. Laura mentions this aunt in Pioneer Girl but does not list of any children. She had another cousin—Edith, daughter of Peter and Eliza Ingalls, who was nicknamed Dolly Varden.

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